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  • Trail 5. Mont Louis





    Mont Louis is another Vauban garrison town. Today it is a centre for commando training. The Mackintoshes came here first in 1925 and then every summer until Mackintosh was diagnosed with throat cancer in 1927.





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  • Trail 5. Mont Louis






    In the spring, the pastures were a carpet of wild flowers and Mackintosh did a number of still-life flower paintings. He called it fairyland.

  • Trail 5. Mont Louis





    On the final ascent to Mont Louis you pass through the small village of Fetges. Pass through the village and just before the road does a u-bend to the left over a bridge, take the small road up the hill to the right. This takes you above the village and where a road turns right downhill into the houses is where Mackintosh painted "Mountain Village".

  • Trail 5. Fetges

    22. A Mountain Village

    Untraced



    The painting is currently lost and the site is unmarked. Return to the main road and walk back towards the village.

  • Trail 5. Fetges

    23. The Boulders

    Hunterian Art Gallery,
    University of Glasgow


    On the right hand side there is a break in the wall with a track leading down a steep slope to what was the old mill. Here you will find the reproduction of "The Boulders".

  • Trail 5. Fetges

    23. The Boulders

    Hunterian Art Gallery,
    University of Glasgow


    Mackintosh must have had a position on the other side of the gully just below the present road. It is now wooded but in his day was open. From the location of the reproduction, the house is above you on the roadside and the boulder is below you. From across the valley he cheated the boulder higher up to make a better composition.

  • Trail 5. Fetges

    24. Fetges

    Tate, London


    Continue up the road to Mont Louis and on your right is a parking area. On the other side of the road there are two panels on the hillside in front of you and two 100 yards down the hill to the left. Go down the hill first. These show two pictures of Fetges painted in different years.

  • Trail 5. Fetges

    25. Slate Roofs

    Glasgow School of Art



    "Slate Roofs" was done in the summer of 1925. The foreground is of course pure artistic invention, as it is in the second painting.

  • Trail 5. Fetges

    24. Fetges

    Tate, London


    Slate Roofs was done from the same spot a year later in 1926 and one can see how his style has developed. He considered this to be one of his most successful paintings. Compared with the earlier work, it is sharper and tighter with disciplined draughtsmanship, precisely controlled washes of pure, barely modulated colour and sharp contrasts of light and shade.

  • Trail 5. Mont-Louis

    26. Mountain Landscape

    Private Collection



    Walk back up the hill and find the other two panels on your left facing the mountains.

  • Trail 5. Mont-Louis

    26. Mountain Landscape



    There is a theory that Mackintosh may have painted this view as a triptych. If so the right hand panel is missing.

  • Trail 5. Mont-Louis

    26. Mountain Landscape

    Private Collection


    This is the centre of the view. The painter and co-founder of the Ceret Museum of Modern Art, Burty Haviland, had his summer house a few hundred yards along to the right and Mackintosh may have been inspired by the view from his garden.

  • Trail 5. Mont-Louis

    27. Mountain Landscape

    Private Collection


    This is the right hand side of the view centred on the small village in the distance.

  • Trail 5. Mont-Louis

    27. Mountain Landscape



    Mont Louis has not changed much since Mackintosh's day. Their favourite hotel was on the right up the main street but they also stayed at Hotel Taverne (then called Hotel Jambon), which still exists.

    Now drive out of Mont Louis and at the first roundabout turn right on to the D118 in the direction of Les Angles. After about 4km you arrive at La Llagonne.

  • Trail 5. La Llagonne

    29. The Church of
    La Llagonne

    Glasgow Museums
    Kelvingrove Art Gallery
    and Museum

    Take the first left off the main road. On the left outside the mairie you will see a reproduction of "The Church of La Llagonne".

  • Trail 5. La Llagonne

    29. The Church of
    La Llagonne




    To find the spot where he sat, go further on and take the first track to left beside the cemetery and into the field with a big wooden cross.

  • Trail 5. La Llagonne

    29. The Church of
    La Llagonne

    Glasgow Museums
    Kelvingrove Art Gallery
    and Museum


    From here now walk up to the church.


  • Trail 5. La Llagonne

    28. The Village of
    La Llagonne

    Glasgow Museums
    Kelvingrove Art Gallery
    and Museum

    At the church where you will find "The Village of La Llagonne".

  • Trail 5. La Llagonne

    28. The Village of
    La Llagonne

    Glasgow Museums
    Kelvingrove Art Gallery
    and Museum

    The roofs, the rocks and the shadows combine natural features with man made shapes in an architecturally designed landscape.

  • Trail 5. La Llagonne

    28. The Village of
    La Llagonne




    In reality the rocks are not there Mackintosh has moved them in from the left to improve the composition.

  • Trail 5. La Llagonne

    28. The Village of
    La Llagonne




    Amazingly, the cart in the picture is still in the farmyard after nearly a hundred years.

  • Trail 5. La Llagonne

    28. Poor Mans Village



    Leaving La Llagonne towards les Angles at the end of the first bend, if you go down into the field on your right (below Hotel Corrieu) you can finds the place where Mackintosh painted "Poor Man's Village".

  • Trail 5. La Llagonne

    28. Poor Mans Village



    The painting has been lost and all we have of it is this photograph taken at an exhibition in London after Mackintosh's death.

  • Trail 5. Roussillon





    In the summer of 1927, their summer holiday was cut short. Mackintosh was rushed back to London for surgery. He had cancer of the throat.

    In December 1928 he died.

  • Trail 5. Roussillon






    In 1929 on the anniversary of his death, his widow Margaret came back to scatter his ashes in the waters of Port Vendres in the land he had come to love so much.



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